johannes wagener

lolcatbiz:

Whoops, it’s been a while since my last post. What happened? Well Berlin Summer came and took its toll. And so I got stuck:

Stuck

TypeWriter.tw

The typewriter project I’ve announced was taking of course just a bit longer than expected. The initial idea was to build a text editor for the web…

lolcatbiz:

Consistently late by a day and even worse I’ve abandoned the project I’ve announced (see bottom). So on saturday I just went for better idea that I always wanted to do: Building an adventure game! To be realistic, given the fact that I only had 4 days left, I focused mainly on the engine and…

lolcatbiz:

After deciding to leave SoundCloud I immediatly began to think about what to do next. While looking for inspiration I made a list of startups that inspired me most. Interestingly on top of that list was a site which actually isn’t a startup: Wikipedia.

With over 22 million articles it is still…

lolcatbiz:

Last week was my last day as a developer at SoundCloud and I moved back from beautiful, boring San Francisco to cheap ‘n ass-kicking Berlin. So I thought I better come up with a plan to keep myself busy before falling into the tempting convenience of being another lazy barfly in the sweet, sweet…

 
In the last months I’ve worked more and more on small client side apps and hacks. They usually consist only of a couple of html files, javascripts and stylesheets and don’t require any dynamic backend at all. 
Out of pure laziness I’ve just “deployed” most of them in my public DropBox folder and then just shared the public link. That works amazingly well but has the big drawback of ugly URLs! What’s missing is very simple, fast way of setting up and deploying new websites.
The Amazon S3 website feature that was introduced a couple of month ago is already quite handy for this.
One thing which is still a hazzle is setting up the CNAME record to get a nice hostname. I’ve fixed that by setting up a wildcard A record for *.ponyho.st, so basically everyone can now create a S3 bucket for a ponyho.st subdomain and use it as a website. Nice.
The other problem is to make the creation of the bucket and the pushing of the files as simple as possible. For that I’ve created a quick n dirty gem that takes care of this:
      $ cd your-website
      $ gem install ponyhost
      $ ponyhost create foobar
      $ ponyhost push foobar
      $ open http://foobar.ponyho.st
If you don’t like the *.ponyho.st domain you can also use your own domain by simply naming the bucket www.yoursite.com and setting up a CNAME record to s3-website-us-east-1.amazonaws.com.
As a bonus I’ve included a very basic HTTP server to simplify local development.
Have a look at “ponyhost help“ for more infos or find all the stuff here:
  http://ponyho.st  http://github.com/jwagener/ponyHost
Happy Hacking.

 

In the last months I’ve worked more and more on small client side apps and hacks. They usually consist only of a couple of html files, javascripts and stylesheets and don’t require any dynamic backend at all. 

Out of pure laziness I’ve just “deployed” most of them in my public DropBox folder and then just shared the public link. That works amazingly well but has the big drawback of ugly URLs! What’s missing is very simple, fast way of setting up and deploying new websites.

The Amazon S3 website feature that was introduced a couple of month ago is already quite handy for this.

One thing which is still a hazzle is setting up the CNAME record to get a nice hostname. I’ve fixed that by setting up a wildcard A record for *.ponyho.st, so basically everyone can now create a S3 bucket for a ponyho.st subdomain and use it as a website. Nice.

The other problem is to make the creation of the bucket and the pushing of the files as simple as possible. For that I’ve created a quick n dirty gem that takes care of this:

      $ cd your-website

      $ gem install ponyhost

      $ ponyhost create foobar

      $ ponyhost push foobar

      $ open http://foobar.ponyho.st

If you don’t like the *.ponyho.st domain you can also use your own domain by simply naming the bucket www.yoursite.com and setting up a CNAME record to s3-website-us-east-1.amazonaws.com.

As a bonus I’ve included a very basic HTTP server to simplify local development.

Have a look at “ponyhost help“ for more infos or find all the stuff here:

  http://ponyho.st
  http://github.com/jwagener/ponyHost

Happy Hacking.

Introducing HTTMultiParty

In the last weeks I’ve been working on the new SoundCloud Ruby Gem. It is based on the excellent HTTParty gem, which currently doesn’t support HTTP Multipart uploads. Since this is a requirement to upload tracks to SoundCloud, I’ve built a small wrapper around HTTParty called HTTMultiParty which provides exactly that feature. It is available on GitHub.

Introducing RecButton.com

A few weeks ago I went to the small island Rögrund in the swedish archipelago to hack and chillax with a couple of nerds. Together with Eric and Alex we started to hack on the RecButton.com, which we were finally able to finish and release last week. So here we go:


It is a very simple website which just shows a button to record audio and once you’ve done that you are able to rehear what you’ve recorded and push it to SoundCloud to share and distribute it.

To capture the audio from your microphone it uses a new API from Adobe Flash 10.1, which allows you to buffer the raw recorded audio directly in the client instead of using a flash media server. I plan to release the flash recorder plus a small javascript wrapper for it as a seperate project. For now you’ll find the undocumented and messy code in my github repository.

Happy Hacking!

Another hack quicky: loc.n31.de

Another quick hack from the last week is loc.n31.de. The name and address are just temporary, until I find better ones. The idea is quite simple. You’re somewhere in the middle of nowhere and try to point a friend to your current location. So you just go to loc.n31.de using your fancy new smart phone which supports the geolocation standard. Once you’re there you’ll get a shortlink to your current location on google maps. Copy and paste that into an SMS and send it. The recipient opens the link in his shiny iphone and knows where you are. Done.

Well of course you could also use the share location feature in your iPhone Maps app, but that just supports sharing via MMS or EMail. And I’ve always missed SMS support since I think it’s a bit more direct than an Email and a bit cheaper and more commonly used than an MMS.